Lab News


Drugs that calm ‘touch neurons’ may ease autism traits

Spectrumnews.org

BY NICHOLETTE ZELIADT  /  AUGUST, 8 2019

“New drug that calms activity in ‘touch neurons’ eases sensory reactivity, anxiety and social difficulties in certain mouse models of autism.”

“…’Despite the fact that these animal models have very different molecular mechanisms underlying their behavior, there is a common circuit. It’s making me think in a different way about research on autism’…”


A Light Touch On Sociability

Cell

By Nuria Dominguez-Iturza and Claudia Bagni / August 8, 2019

“Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is prevalent, complex, and heterogeneous, and currently there is no cure. Identifying shared mechanisms across the ASD spectrum is of utmost importance for therapeutic intervention. Orefice et al. show that tackling the GABAA receptor pathway in the peripheral somatosensory system in various ASD mouse models rescues core ASD-like phenotypes.”




Soothing sensory sensitivity may ease social problems in mice

Spectrumnews.org

BY NICHOLETTE ZELIADT  /  12 NOVEMBER 2017

“The findings suggest that some features of autism arise from malfunctioning neurons outside the brain and spinal cord, says Lauren Orefice, a research fellow in David Ginty’s lab at Harvard University. They also hint that treatments targeting these peripheral neurons could help to ease some features of the condition.”


Notable papers of 2016

Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative

SPECIAL REPORTS / 2016: YEAR IN REVIEW / 26 DECEMBER 2016

“This year, as we do every year, we asked scientists to help us choose the 10 most ‘notable’ autism papers — ones that transformed the field in some significant way.

The final selection highlights several advances in the field. Researchers are homing in on immune molecules that may play a role in autism risk. And new tools, from genetically engineered animals to massive genetic databases, will be a boon to future research.

Orefice L. et alCell 166, 299-313 (2016): The anxiety and trouble with social skills seen in people with autism stem largely from neurons outside the brain that govern touch.”


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Autism may stem—in part—from a disordered sense of touch

Science / Sciencemag.org

By Teal Burrell / June 9, 2016



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